top of page

Search results

16 items found for ""

  • P9 | Podcast (Português)

    EN Colaborações Artigos, livros de bolso e alfabetização midiática ◣ Articles, bilingual pocket books, and media literacy

  • P9 | Podcast (English)

    PT Guest appearances Artigos, livros de bolso e alfabetização midiática ◣ Articles, bilingual pocket books, and media literacy

  • P9 | Team ◣ Time

    Time ◣ Tea m ​ Mirna W abi-Sabi fundadora • diretora • editora chefe ◣ founding member • director • editor-in-chief ​ ​ Fabio Teixeira fundador • fotojornalista ◣ founding member • photojournalist ​ ​ Cajú Media identidade visual • marketing ◣ visual identity • marketing ​ ​ Ana Botner editora ◣ editor ​ • • • • • • • • • ​ escritores ◣ writers ​ Donya Ahmadi Eduardo Barbosa Fabiana Faleiros Felipe Lott Fernanda Grigolin Jere Kuzmanić Patrick Farnsworth Silvia Federici ​ ​ artistas visuais ◣ visual artists ​ Alejandra Robles Iasmin Rios Izabela Moreira Karla Sampaio Riccardo Riccio Saide Jabani Sara Kovač Trovão Tropical Volodea Biri ​ ​ revisores ◣ revisers ​ Guilherme Ryuichi Nox Morningstar ​ ​ tradutores ◣ translators ​ Felipe Moretti Lilo Assenci ​ ​ ​

  • P9 | Policies ◣ Políticas

    Nossas Políticas ◣ Our Policies Nossos Princípios ◣ Our Principles ​ Nossos interesses orbitam estratégias de combate às injustiças sociais e econômicas, à supremacia branca e ao patriarcado. Através da disseminação da produção intelectual de pessoas marginalizadas, e da formação midiática necessária para a criação de conteúdo, acreditamos que mudanças essenciais podem ser alcançadas na sociedade. ​ Our interests orbit strategies to combat social and economic injustices, white supremacy and the patriarchy. Through the dissemination of the intellectual production of marginalized peoples, and the media production training necessary for the creation of content, we believe that essential changes can be achieved in society. ​ Privacidade & Segurança ◣ Privacy & Safety ​ A Plataforma9 não cede ou vende dados pessoais de clientes, ou parceiros, a outras companhias, indivíduos ou corporações. Você pode sempre entrar em contato conosco com um pedido de acesso, edição ou remoção de seus dados pessoais da nossa plataforma. Informações compartilhadas nas mídias sociais podem ser usadas para identificar uma audiência com interesses compatíveis com os nossos. ​ Plataforma9 does not give or sell the personal data of our clients or partners to any other company, individual or corporation. You can always contact us with a request to access, edit, or remove your personal data from our platform.​ Information shared on social media can be used to identify an audience with interests compatible with ours. ​ Revendas e Atacado ◣ Wholesale Inquiries Entre em contato conosco para saber mais sobre opções de compra em grande escala e revendas. Get in touch with us to know more about our wholesale options. Payment Method Métodos de Pagamento ◣ Payment Methods Boleto / Cartões de crédito e débito brasileiros / PayPal Internacional / PIX PayPal / Brazilian Credit or Debit Cards

  • P9 | Media Literacy

    PT What is Media Literacy? The same way we learn how to read and write text, we can learn how to interpret online content. Reading and writing are, in one way, tools for consuming and producing content, but in private. Media is the means of mass dissemination of this content. And to communicate with large amounts of people, several different avenues can be used, like radio, print publications, and the internet. Internet media is disseminated through websites, and these websites are platforms for media content. This content has an address: a link. Once we have the ability to read and write (which is literacy), we have the ability to consume and produce media in platforms with massive audiences (media literacy). Media literacy isn’t widely taught, though, not just in the internet era. We aren’t generally taught how books are published, radios are broadcasted, or how websites are built. This knowledge was often reserved for professionals in these fields, until social media democratized mass distribution of personal content (for better or for worse). Now more than ever, media literacy is a necessity for all people, of all ages. Below you will find a short course, consisting of a checklist on what to look for when consuming online content. The output of those who filled out this checklist is presented collectively in the ‘results’ section, with graphs, maps, and databases. Through this process, we train ourselves to look for relevant information, and see our individual consumption of online content in a broader context – the global online context in which we find ourselves. FORM RESULTS THE HISTORY Since the invention of the German printing press in the 15th century, which birthed the method of reproducing media on a large scale and revolutionized the consumption of information in the West, there has been false news. It was very common for these false news to be directed towards a marginalized contingent of society, such as Jewish, indigenous and black peoples. Sometimes, atrocities committed by ‘undesirable’ members of society were made up. Other times, atrocities committed by ‘desirable’ members of society were omitted. In other words, deceptive media is one that not only lies, but also omits truthful information. Because of the continued presence of falsehood in the media over the past five centuries, many journalists like to say that ‘fake news’ is not new – but it is. The term ‘fake news’ says more about the media age in which we find ourselves, than the practice of disseminating misinformation. False information has always circulated through media, but today it circulates in a particular way, with the use of new technological tools, such as social media boosts and bots. In the first half of the 20th century, the first Brazilian ‘media baron’, Assis Chateaubriand, threatened to ruin the reputations of people and companies with false news in exchange for money (essentially blackmail). Today, technological advances significantly changed the format in which these false news get disseminated, and by whom. What’s App, Facebook, Twitter, Telegram, Instagram are explosive and unprecedented formats of disseminating media. Most people are able to produce media content, and most of those who can, do it constantly. When we see news on one of these platforms, we also see who and how many people reacted to it, which influences not only what we feel about the news, but also about the others who consume it – all instantly. We can believe or stop believing something depending on who or how many people ‘shared it’ or ‘liked it’. In terms of ‘who’, it’s enough for a famous or credible person to believe and ‘share it’ for “the bewildered herd” (From Chomsky in Media Control) to follow. This is where ‘influencers’ come in. It terms of ‘how many’, a high number of shares helps the post reach a wider audience by appearing relevant to social media algorithms and to the people seeing it. That’s where bots come in. Here is an example of false news. Here (Abcnews.com.co) is an example of ‘fake news.’ One comes from a platform that still exists and lied. It’s an example of bad journalism. The other (Abcnews.com.co) doesn’t even exist as a platform, it pretends to be something it isn’t. We would not find this link by searching for it on our own, it is created to be believable on Facebook, as an ad. ‘Fake news’ sites have the specific purpose of buying ads on social media. [Note that I didn’t use a hyperlink for the fake news site, because I don’t want it as a backlink or as part of their PageRank.] THE TRUTH The starting point of truth is our subjectivity, it depends on each one’s perspective. All media produced by someone is a result of that person’s subjectivity. It’s necessary to be in contact with our own subjectivity, in order to be able to discern the veracity of what others produce. More important than finding answers, is asking the right questions. It’s okay if you can’t find the answers to all questions. The important thing is the process of research, because sometimes not finding the answer is valuable information in itself. Is the platform being as transparent as it could be? Lie or Deception? A lie is when, for example, an author invents information. An author can be deceptive or misleading without inventing anything. They may select truthful information, omit another piece of information, place these pieces out of context, and use sensational tools to provoke certain emotions in the audience. Generally, media literacy courses focus on how to identify objective and neutral journalistic language. This, however, does not exist. It is not always easy to discern sensational and misleading tools from effective or creative methods of delivering information to an audience. Some identifiable tools, even if subjective, are: – Dramatic music. – Shocking images and words. – Exclamation points. – Titles that cause fear, and pass on little information. – Titles that speak directly to you. Focusing on a guideline or checklist on how to identify ‘fake news’ can make us even more vulnerable to them. These guidelines can become new, effective tools for their dissemination. For example, if I say to you: “only trust newspapers that do not use exclamation points on titles,” this guideline can be used by any deceitful platform to gain your trust. A much stronger tool than memorizing identifiable ‘fake news’ characteristics is to have a clear sense of your own values, and political goals. ‘Fake News’, ‘bots’ and people with an interest in using these tools to steer the behavior of a wide audience, target ‘influenceable’ and undecided people. That doesn’t necessarily mean people who are on the fence about a subject. Dogmatic people are as easy to influence, because their reference of truth is outside themselves. That’s why the search for your own truth is fundamental to make ‘fake news’ ineffective, which is the most effective way to combat it. Thought, speech, and action should be one, as should your ideas, what you share with others and how you live your life. This is an exercise in balance – being open to learning new things, while not losing sight of your own truth and lived experiences. THE AUDIENCE When we produce media, we think of a target audience so that we can make it effective in delivering the message. A newspaper, for example, has an audience, and the values ​​of each one of them exist in symbiosis. The media literacy process involves the analysis of the values ​​of the institutions and/or people that produce media, based on the recognition of our own values ​​as an audience. Many people who produce media on the internet are not honest, or transparent, about what their values ​​and intentions are. There are media tactics that aim to manipulate a specific audience, that use tools that provoke targeted emotions. Art also aims to provoke emotions; academic writing is intended to be verifiable and validated. These are tools that can be used in ways that are subtle, exaggerated, effective, manipulative, untruthful, misleading, etc. Our analysis of how these tools are used depends on our understanding of how we use them ourselves, and why. What constitutes content accessible to the general public? For content to be accessible, it needs to be able to reach the audience it sets out to reach. For example, for a video to reach an Instagram audience, it needs to last a maximum of one minute, because this is (or was) the limitation of the platform visited by that audience. How to identify whether a text aims to reach a lay audience, and not just a specialized one? A person who is not specialized and has no interest in specializing in a certain area of ​​study will spend less time reading about this subject. So, for texts to reach this audience, they must be short. Short online texts do not need an abstract, summary, numbered sections, etc. A long text is not necessarily inaccessible. Another way of identifying the level of accessibility is to recognize excessive citations/references, usually redirecting the reader to other, even longer, academic texts. Academic requirements reflect the audience that the author intended to reach. Specific acronyms and terms have the same function. To reach a lay audience, terms must be defined, and acronyms that aren’t widespread in popular culture must be spelled out the first time they are mentioned. FBI or CIA, for example, are not acronyms that need to be spelled out, but NCI does. GLOSSARY Audience (in media) – “A media audience may be as small as one person reading a magazine or as large as billions of people around the world watching events, like 9/11, unfold live on television. Audiences have a complex relationship with the products they consume.” (New Zealand’s Ministry of Education) ‘Bot’ (on social media) – “is an agent that communicates more or less autonomously on social media, often with the task of influencing the course of discussion and/or the opinions of its readers. It is related to chatbots but mostly only uses rather simple interactions or no reactivity at all.” (Wikipedia) Dogma – “a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true.” (Oxford Languages) ‘Fake News’ – “is a form of news consisting of deliberate disinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional news media or online social media.” (Wikipedia) Media – “the main means of mass communication (broadcasting, publishing, and the Internet) regarded collectively.” (Oxford Languages) Sensationalism – “(especially in journalism) the use of exciting or shocking stories or language at the expense of accuracy, in order to provoke public interest or excitement.” (Oxford Languages) Social Media – “websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking.” (Oxford Languages) Form Results

  • P9 | MATA bolsonarismo

    Press-Release: MATA bolsonarismo Brochure 78 pages 110x180x5mm ISBN 9786585267007 Our publisher P9 launches in March 2023 the pre-sale of the book 'MATA Bolsonarismo ’ — the second edition of a mini anthology which includes the article and part of Fabio Teixeira's photographic series, 'The dehumanizing narrative surrounding police killings in Rio de Janeiro ’, aw arded in 2022 in the category of photojournalism at the 39th Journalism Human Rights Award and honorable mention in 44th Vladimir Herzog Prize . ​ The anthology includes the following articles: •Between Balas and Garimpos: The lives of indigenous peoples and black favela residents under the state of exception (by Eduardo Barbosa). •Bolsonarism, Nationalism as a Religion (by Felipe Lott). •Brazil's gun policies mimic those of the US, but have greater class divisions (by Mirna Wabi-Sabi). •The Inefficiencies of Democracy and Police Operations in Favelas (by Mirna Wabi-Sabi). •The Dehumanizing Narrative Around Police Murders in Rio de Janeiro (by Mirna Wabi-Sabi). The first edition of the mini anthology MATA 'Das Bruxas ' came out in 2021, and focused on Silvia Federici’s feminist theory, with an unpublished article by her in Brazil, interviews with her and an article by PROAC-awarded artist Fabiana Faleiros. This year, we chose to analyze the Brazilian Bolsonarist period, because we recognize that to effectively ensure that atrocious political phenomena do not recur, it is necessary to understand how they emerged, and what feeds them. Our work with Fabio Teixeira, one of the founders of Plataforma9, also generated debate on the need to contextualize photojournalistic images, a topic addressed in the article that accompanies and entitles the award-winning photographic series. The virtual launch of 'MATA Bolsonarismo' will take place in the months of March and April , and books sold during the pre-sale will be distributed at the end of May. ​ ABOUT US Plataforma9 is a journalistic initiative that publishes articles and paperbacks in several languages and in several countries. So far we have books in Portuguese, English, Spanish and Indonesian, and we sell in Brazil, United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Australia, Mexico, Peru, Argentina and Chile, and also in Indonesia with a partner publisher called Sabate. We also offer editing, media literacy and copywriting services. Our books are the size of a smartphone , made to be portable, and read anywhere. MATA bolsonarismo R$39.00 Price View Details MATA bolsonarismo [digital] R$ 9,00 Regular Price R$ 6,00 Sale Price View Details

  • P9 | River Ecobarrier

    Survey of solid waste at the João Mendes Eco-barrier Read the article 'Eco-barriers and restoring balance between species on the planet' he re . Eco-barriers are barriers at the mouth, or outflow point, of rivers in megacities. –microtrash is registered as a separate category, and means a mixture of small waste such as cigarette butts, microtubes of narcotics, fragmented Styrofoam, other plastics and plant parts that are entangled by this waste. –tetra pack is also recorded separately, as they are those packages with a mixed composition of metal, paper and plastic, often used for products such as milk, juice and tomato sauce. - There are other identified materials, but not individually categorized, such as occasional toys, electronic waste, light bulbs, tires, mattresses, etc. – While the unidentified waste are the closed bags found at the barrier that are not opened because they may contain materials that pose a risk to the health of volunteers – such as syringes, blades, diapers, condoms, used toilet paper, etc. "The amount of solid waste (garbage) that has been thrown into the João Mendes river weekly (about 250 kg) also contributes significantly to the pollution of the João Mendes river, showing still precarious sanitation conditions." Volume or Pluviometric Index is measured by millimeter of rain per square meter in a certain place and period. Source: (A627, from INMET ) Panel.

  • P9 | A History of the Iranian Women's Rights Movement

    Brochure 132 pages 110x180x8mm Farsi-English: ISBN 9786585267045 Portuguese-English: ISBN 9786585267038 A History of the Iranian Women's Rights Movement O movimento iraniano pelo direito das mulheres لاله های سرکش جنبش زنان ایران، از مشروطه تا امروز Bilingual book: English/Portuguese or English/Farsi ​ Historical accounts often bypass this important legacy of the twentieth century Iranian women’s movement, crediting Khomeini’s charismatic leadership as the sole contributing factor to the mass mobilization of women, particularly those from working-class and conservative backgrounds. ​ R eductionist tales, recalling orientalist essentialism, portray Muslim women as passive recipients of politics, who blindly follow the authority of religious men in their pursuit of political power. This book shows that Iranian women have been all but passive victims, and that their political contributions and organizing have been key to any progre ss made on behalf of sociopolitical movem ents in contemporary Iran. ​ About the a uthor Dr. Donya Ahmadi is Assistant Professor of International Relations, Department of International Relations and International Organization at the University of Groningen. ​ ◣ Livro bilíngue: in glês/português brasileir o ​ Relatos históricos, muitas vezes, ignoram esse legado importante do movimento de mulheres iranianas do século XX, creditando a liderança carismática de Khomeini como o único fator que contribuiu para a mobilização em massa de mulheres, particularmente aquelas de origem trabalhadora e conservadora. ​ Cont os reducionistas, que lembram o essencialismo orientalista, retratam as mulheres muçulmanas como recipientes passivos da política, que seguem cegamente a autoridade de homens religiosos em sua busca pelo poder político. Este livro mostra que as mulheres iranianas foram tudo menos vítimas passivas, e que suas contribuições e organizações políticas foram fundamentais para qualquer progresso feito em nome de movimentos socio-políticos no Irã contemporâneo. ​ Sobre a autora Dra. Donya Ahmadi é Professora de Relações Internacionais, Departamento de Relações Internacionais e Organização Internacional da Universidade de Groningen. ​ ​ ◣ کتاب دو زبانه: انگلیسی /فارسی ​ منابع تاریخی، معمولاً بر میراث مهم جنبش زنان ایرانی در قرن بیستم چشم بسته و رهبری کاریزماتیک خمینی را، عامل اصلی به حرکت درآمدن توده‌ی زنان، به‌ویژه زنان متعلق به طبقات فرودست و خانواده‌های مذهبی-سنتی می‌دانند چنین داستان‌های تقلیل‌گرایانه‌ای، یادآور ذات‌گرایی اورینتالیستی هستند که زنان مسلمان را صرفاً مخاطبان منفعل سیاست می‌دانند. کسانی که کورکورانه از اقتدار مردان مذهبی مدعی قدرت سیاسی پیروی می‌کنند ​ اما این کتاب نشان می‌دهد که زنان ایرانی، نه‌تنها قربانیانی منفعل نبوده‌اند؛ بلکه فعالیت سیاسی و قدرت سازماندهی آنان در مسیر دستیابی به هرگونه پیشرفتی که در جنبش‌های اجتماعی- سیاسی ایران حاصل شده؛ نقشی کلیدی ایفا نموده است درباره نویسنده دنیا احمدی ستادیار روابط بین الملل، دانشگاه خرونینگن ​ ____ A BOUT P9 Plataforma9 is a journ alistic i nitiat ive that publish es article s and pocket books in several languages ​​and in several countries. So far we hav e books in Portuguese, English, Spa nish, Farsi and Indonesian, and we sell in Brazil, United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Austr alia , Mexico, Peru, Argentina and Chile, and also in Indonesia with a partner publisher called Sabate. We also offer editing, media literacy and copywriting services. Our books are the size of a smartphone, made to be portable, and read anywhere. ​ SOB RE A P9 A Plataforma9 é uma iniciativa jornalística que publica artigos e livros de bolso em diversas línguas e em diversos países. Até agora temos livros em português, inglês, espanhol , fársi e indonésio, e vendemos no Brasil, Estados Unidos, Reino Unido, União Europeia, Austrália, México, Peru, Argentina e Chile, e também na Indonésia com uma editora parceir a chamada Sabate. Também oferecemos serviços de edição, alfabetização midiática e p rodução de texto. Nossos livr os são do tamanho de um smartphone , feitos para serem portáteis, e lidos em qualquer lugar. ​ A History of the Iranian Women's Rights Movement لاله های سرکش جنبش زنان ایران R$ 39,00 Price View Details Iranian Women's Rights Movement | O movimento iraniano pelo direito das mulheres R$39.00 Price View Details A History of the Iranian Women's Rights Movement [digital] R$ 19,00 Price View Details

  • P9 | Alfabetização Midiática

    EN What is Media Literacy? The same way we learn how to read and write text, we can learn how to interpret online content. Reading and writing are, in one way, tools for consuming and producing content, but in private. Media is the means of mass dissemination of this content. And to communicate with large amounts of people, several different avenues can be used, like radio, print publications, and the internet. Internet media is disseminated through websites, and these websites are platforms for media content. This content has an address: a link. Once we have the ability to read and write (which is literacy), we have the ability to consume and produce media in platforms with massive audiences (media literacy). Media literacy isn’t widely taught, though, not just in the internet era. We aren’t generally taught how books are published, radios are broadcasted, or how websites are built. This knowledge was often reserved for professionals in these fields, until social media democratized mass distribution of personal content (for better or for worse). Now more than ever, media literacy is a necessity for all people, of all ages. Below you will find a short course, consisting of a checklist on what to look for when consuming online content. The output of those who filled out this checklist is presented collectively in the ‘results’ section, with graphs, maps, and databases. Through this process, we train ourselves to look for relevant information, and see our individual consumption of online content in a broader context – the global online context in which we find ourselves. FORM RESULTS THE HISTORY Since the invention of the German printing press in the 15th century, which birthed the method of reproducing media on a large scale and revolutionized the consumption of information in the West, there has been false news. It was very common for these false news to be directed towards a marginalized contingent of society, such as Jewish, indigenous and black peoples. Sometimes, atrocities committed by ‘undesirable’ members of society were made up. Other times, atrocities committed by ‘desirable’ members of society were omitted. In other words, deceptive media is one that not only lies, but also omits truthful information. Because of the continued presence of falsehood in the media over the past five centuries, many journalists like to say that ‘fake news’ is not new – but it is. The term ‘fake news’ says more about the media age in which we find ourselves, than the practice of disseminating misinformation. False information has always circulated through media, but today it circulates in a particular way, with the use of new technological tools, such as social media boosts and bots. In the first half of the 20th century, the first Brazilian ‘media baron’, Assis Chateaubriand, threatened to ruin the reputations of people and companies with false news in exchange for money (essentially blackmail). Today, technological advances significantly changed the format in which these false news get disseminated, and by whom. What’s App, Facebook, Twitter, Telegram, Instagram are explosive and unprecedented formats of disseminating media. Most people are able to produce media content, and most of those who can, do it constantly. When we see news on one of these platforms, we also see who and how many people reacted to it, which influences not only what we feel about the news, but also about the others who consume it – all instantly. We can believe or stop believing something depending on who or how many people ‘shared it’ or ‘liked it’. In terms of ‘who’, it’s enough for a famous or credible person to believe and ‘share it’ for “the bewildered herd” (From Chomsky in Media Control) to follow. This is where ‘influencers’ come in. It terms of ‘how many’, a high number of shares helps the post reach a wider audience by appearing relevant to social media algorithms and to the people seeing it. That’s where bots come in. Here is an example of false news. Here (Abcnews.com.co) is an example of ‘fake news.’ One comes from a platform that still exists and lied. It’s an example of bad journalism. The other (Abcnews.com.co) doesn’t even exist as a platform, it pretends to be something it isn’t. We would not find this link by searching for it on our own, it is created to be believable on Facebook, as an ad. ‘Fake news’ sites have the specific purpose of buying ads on social media. [Note that I didn’t use a hyperlink for the fake news site, because I don’t want it as a backlink or as part of their PageRank.] THE TRUTH The starting point of truth is our subjectivity, it depends on each one’s perspective. All media produced by someone is a result of that person’s subjectivity. It’s necessary to be in contact with our own subjectivity, in order to be able to discern the veracity of what others produce. More important than finding answers, is asking the right questions. It’s okay if you can’t find the answers to all questions. The important thing is the process of research, because sometimes not finding the answer is valuable information in itself. Is the platform being as transparent as it could be? Lie or Deception? A lie is when, for example, an author invents information. An author can be deceptive or misleading without inventing anything. They may select truthful information, omit another piece of information, place these pieces out of context, and use sensational tools to provoke certain emotions in the audience. Generally, media literacy courses focus on how to identify objective and neutral journalistic language. This, however, does not exist. It is not always easy to discern sensational and misleading tools from effective or creative methods of delivering information to an audience. Some identifiable tools, even if subjective, are: – Dramatic music. – Shocking images and words. – Exclamation points. – Titles that cause fear, and pass on little information. – Titles that speak directly to you. Focusing on a guideline or checklist on how to identify ‘fake news’ can make us even more vulnerable to them. These guidelines can become new, effective tools for their dissemination. For example, if I say to you: “only trust newspapers that do not use exclamation points on titles,” this guideline can be used by any deceitful platform to gain your trust. A much stronger tool than memorizing identifiable ‘fake news’ characteristics is to have a clear sense of your own values, and political goals. ‘Fake News’, ‘bots’ and people with an interest in using these tools to steer the behavior of a wide audience, target ‘influenceable’ and undecided people. That doesn’t necessarily mean people who are on the fence about a subject. Dogmatic people are as easy to influence, because their reference of truth is outside themselves. That’s why the search for your own truth is fundamental to make ‘fake news’ ineffective, which is the most effective way to combat it. Thought, speech, and action should be one, as should your ideas, what you share with others and how you live your life. This is an exercise in balance – being open to learning new things, while not losing sight of your own truth and lived experiences. THE AUDIENCE When we produce media, we think of a target audience so that we can make it effective in delivering the message. A newspaper, for example, has an audience, and the values ​​of each one of them exist in symbiosis. The media literacy process involves the analysis of the values ​​of the institutions and/or people that produce media, based on the recognition of our own values ​​as an audience. Many people who produce media on the internet are not honest, or transparent, about what their values ​​and intentions are. There are media tactics that aim to manipulate a specific audience, that use tools that provoke targeted emotions. Art also aims to provoke emotions; academic writing is intended to be verifiable and validated. These are tools that can be used in ways that are subtle, exaggerated, effective, manipulative, untruthful, misleading, etc. Our analysis of how these tools are used depends on our understanding of how we use them ourselves, and why. What constitutes content accessible to the general public? For content to be accessible, it needs to be able to reach the audience it sets out to reach. For example, for a video to reach an Instagram audience, it needs to last a maximum of one minute, because this is (or was) the limitation of the platform visited by that audience. How to identify whether a text aims to reach a lay audience, and not just a specialized one? A person who is not specialized and has no interest in specializing in a certain area of ​​study will spend less time reading about this subject. So, for texts to reach this audience, they must be short. Short online texts do not need an abstract, summary, numbered sections, etc. A long text is not necessarily inaccessible. Another way of identifying the level of accessibility is to recognize excessive citations/references, usually redirecting the reader to other, even longer, academic texts. Academic requirements reflect the audience that the author intended to reach. Specific acronyms and terms have the same function. To reach a lay audience, terms must be defined, and acronyms that aren’t widespread in popular culture must be spelled out the first time they are mentioned. FBI or CIA, for example, are not acronyms that need to be spelled out, but NCI does. GLOSSARY Audience (in media) – “A media audience may be as small as one person reading a magazine or as large as billions of people around the world watching events, like 9/11, unfold live on television. Audiences have a complex relationship with the products they consume.” (New Zealand’s Ministry of Education) ‘Bot’ (on social media) – “is an agent that communicates more or less autonomously on social media, often with the task of influencing the course of discussion and/or the opinions of its readers. It is related to chatbots but mostly only uses rather simple interactions or no reactivity at all.” (Wikipedia) Dogma – “a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true.” (Oxford Languages) ‘Fake News’ – “is a form of news consisting of deliberate disinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional news media or online social media.” (Wikipedia) Media – “the main means of mass communication (broadcasting, publishing, and the Internet) regarded collectively.” (Oxford Languages) Sensationalism – “(especially in journalism) the use of exciting or shocking stories or language at the expense of accuracy, in order to provoke public interest or excitement.” (Oxford Languages) Social Media – “websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking.” (Oxford Languages) Formumário Resultados

  • Página de erro 404 | P9

    Error There is nothing here. The page you are looking for was not found. Check the URL or go back to the Homepage. Go to Home

  • P9 | Pretend this is a cellphone

    Pretend This Is A Cellphone ◣ Finge Que Isso É Um Celular Brochura 110 páginas 110x180x8mm ISBN 9786585267014 Brochure 110 pages 110x180x8mm ISBN 9786585267014 In a world full of Fake news, fake faces, fake writers and fake artists, why not fake a smartphone? Pretend that is your skin and words, pretend this is your cellphone. In here, you will find provocations about tech innovation and traditional fascism. What are these innovations, how are they being used against the population, and how are they being instrumentalized by fascist and racist regimes? To answer these questions, Mirna Wabi-Sabi explores the definition and usage of these key terms; fascism, racism, capitalism, new digital technologies, Fintech, data monitoring and virtual vandalism. Her analysis is irreverent and places honesty above finesse. After all, how can we maintain demureness in the face of an unscrupulous system that never ceases to expand and modernize itself. —Disclaimer: It comes with an irreversible Blue light filter but there is no guarantee it will improve your sleep. Pretend This Is A Cellphone is the latest bilingual pocket book from Plataforma9, and was presented for the first time at A Feira do Livro in São Paulo, in June 2023. It includes an article originally published in English in AK Press's exuberant anti-fascist anthology called No Pasarán!: Antifascist Dispatches from a World in Crisis. Followed by an article originally published online at Le Monde Diplomatique, about the author's experience infiltrating Bolsonarista virtual groups; an article originally published in English in the academic journal CyberOrient, on digital monitoring of immigrants in the US and integration policies in the European Union; and finally, a short essay on the rise of Fintechs as they consider themselves to be at the forefront of financial inclusion and the fight against poverty. ​ I ndex Gringos and Fascism Part I: The Anti-[blank] Manual Part II: Capitalism, Fascism And White Supremacy Part III: The White Aesthetic Part IV: Conclusion ​ Virtual Vandalism and the Dispute Against Leftists Digital Monitoring as a Threat to Human Mobility The Ultra Wealthy Dream of Fintech Unicorns ​ ABOUT US Plataforma9 is a journalistic initiative that publishes article s and pocket books in several languages ​​and in several countries. So far we hav e books in Portuguese, English, Spanish and Indonesian, and we sell in Brazil, United States, United Kingdom, European Union, Australia , Mexico, Peru, Argentina and Chile, and also in Indonesia with a partner publisher called Sabate. We also offer editing, media literacy and copywriting services. Our books are the size of a smartphone, made to be portable, and read anywhere. ​ ◣ ​ Num mundo cheio de Fake news, filtros, chatbots e Inteligência Artificial, por que não um fake smartphone? Finge que aquela é a sua pele e a sua palavra; finge que esse livro é o seu celular. Nele você encontrará provocações sobre inovação tecnológica e fascismo tradicional. Quais são essas inovações, como elas estão sendo usadas contra a população, e como elas são instrumentalizadas por regimes fascistas e racistas? Para responder essas perguntas, Mirna Wabi-Sabi explora a definição e o uso desses termos-chave; fascismo, racismo, capitalismo, novas tecnologias digitais, Fintech, monitoramento de dados e vandalismo virtual. Sua análise é irreverente e coloca a honestidade acima da delicadeza. Afinal, como podemos manter o recato diante de um sistema sem escrúpulos que não cessa de expandir e se modernizar. — Isenção de responsabilidade: Esse livro vem com um filtro de luz azul irreversível, mas não há nenhuma garantia de que vai melhorar o seu sono.​ Finge Que Isso É Um Celular (Pretend This Is A Cellphone) é o mais recente livro de bolso bilíngue da Plataforma9, e foi apresentado pela primeira vez n'A Feira do Livro em São Paulo, em junho de 2023. Ele inclui um artigo originalmente publicado em inglês na antologia antifascista exuberante da AK Press chamada No Pasarán!: Antifascist Dispatches from a World in Crisis. Seguido por um artigo originalmente publicado online na Le Monde Diplomatique, sobre a experiência da autora infiltrando grupos virtuais Bolsonaristas; um artigo originalmente publicado em inglês no jornal acadêmico CyberOrient, sobre monitoramento digital de imigrantes nos EUA e políticas de integração na União Europeia; e por fim, um curto ensaio sobre o surto das Fintechs ao se considerarem a vanguarda da inclusão financeira e da luta contra a pobreza. ​ ​​ Í nd ice G ringos e Fascismo 7 Parte I: O Manual A nti-[insira opressão aqui] Parte II: Capitalismo, Fascismo e Supremacia Branca Parte III: A Estética Branca Parte IV: Conclusão O vandalismo virtual e a disputa contra ‘esquerdistas’ Monitoramento digital como ameaça à mobilidade humana Os ultra ricos sonham com unicórnios da Fintech ​ SOBRE NÓS A Plataforma9 é uma iniciati va jornalística que publica artigos e livros de bolso em diversas línguas e em diversos países. Até agora temos livros em português, inglês, espanhol e indonésio, e vendemos no Brasil, Estados Unidos, Reino Unido, União Europeia, Austrália, México, Peru, Argentina e Chile, e também na Indonésia com uma editora parceira chamada Sabate. Também oferecemos serviços de edição, alfabetização midiática e produção de texto. Nossos livr os são do tamanho de um smartphone , feitos para serem portáteis, e lidos em qualquer lugar. Finge Que Isso É Um Celular ◣ Pretend This Is A Cellphone R$ 39,00 Price View Details Pretend This Is A Cellphone ◣ Finge Que Isso É Um Celular [digital] R$ 9,00 Price View Details

  • P9 | MATA | Mini-anthologies

    Quick View MATA bolsonarismo Price R$ 39,00 Add to Cart Quick View MATA bolsonarismo [digital] Regular Price R$ 9,00 Sale Price R$ 6,00 Add to Cart Quick View MATA das bruxas Regular Price R$ 38,00 Sale Price R$ 29,00 Add to Cart Quick View MATA das bruxas [digital] Regular Price R$ 9,00 Sale Price R$ 6,00 Add to Cart 2021 2023

bottom of page